Index

Rev. Frederick Dibblee


Son of Rev. Ebenezer Dibblee
Father of George Javis Dibblee

There are several Frederick Dibblees. This is the oldest, Rev. Frederick Dibblee. He was born in Stamford, Conn., but since he was a Loyalist, he moved north to Canada after the American War of Idependence. He became Rector of Woodstock, New Brunswick.

Timeline
Wife
Children
Land
Career
Will
See also:
Places in Connecticut connected with Dibblees
The Dibblees and the American War of Independence
Wars connected with the Dibblee family
Original texts and relevant websites
Photos taken by John and Celia Dibblee
Extracts from Rev. Frederick Dibblee's Diary
Articles based on Rev. Frederick Dibblee's Diary
Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online
Extracts from first years of NB Church of England
Land grants and maps
Newspapers, cemetery records, census, directories, university alumni
Places connected with Rev. Frederick Dibblee and others
Map of places mentioned in Rev. Frederick Dibblee's diary


Modern dateTimelineEvidence
9 Dec 1753Frederick, son of Rev. Ebenezer Dibblee, born in Stamford.Raymond Accounts
c.1771-1776Frederick studied at King's College, New York.Canadian biographies
Nov 1776Stamford loyalists, including Frederick, were removed to Lebanon, Conn.Canadian biographies
April 1777Frederick fled to Long Island to join his brother FylerCanadian biographies
1781/2Frederick married Nancy Anna Beach.Frederick's biog
c. May 1783Frederick Dibblee came to St. John.Raymond Accounts
9 Aug 1784Frederick Dibblee gets land grant in Parr Town (St John).Land grant
Easter 1785Frederick Dibblee chosen to read prayers in Kingston.Raymond Accounts
3 Mar 1787John, son of Frederick Dibblee was born.
1787Frederick Dibblee appointed to establish a school for the Indians of the upper St. John riverRaymond Accounts
1788Dibblee family settles at Woodstock. Frederick Dibblee is lay reader there.
1790William S.I., son of Frederick Dibblee, was born.
23 Oct 1791Frederick Dibblee visits Halifax to be ordained Deacon.
1792Maria Jane, daughter of Frederick Dibblee, was born.
19 Aug 1792Frederick Dibblee was ordained rector in Holy Trinity Chruch, St John.History of Trinity Church
c. 1793Frederick Dibblee buys land in Woodstock.Land grant
1794Richard, son of Frederick Dibblee, was born.
1796Elizabeth, daughter of Frederick Dibblee, was born.
1797Frederic Beach, son of Frederick Dibblee, was born.
1800George Jarvis, son of Frederick Dibblee, was born.
1802Henry Ebenezer, son of Frederick Dibblee, was born.
1804David Lewis, son of Frederick Dibblee, was born.
16 Jan 1822Rev. Frederick Dibblee has land grant of 500 acres.Land grant
17 May 1826Frederick Dibblee dies in Woodstock.Raymond Accounts


Wife

From the website giving The Biography of Rev. F. Dibblee, Rector of Woodstock by Alice I. Conlon: "In Nov of 1776 Frederick, with other Stamford Loyalist, was transported to eastern CT, but was allowed to return home in the spring of 1777. His stay was short, for in April, when the King's troops attacked and burned Danbury, his life was threatened when he refused to take an active part with the rebels. He fled to Long Island to join his brother Flyer. Here he acquired some property, and engaged in trade with Mr. Jackson at Oyster Bay. It was during this time, 1781/2, that he married Nancy Anna Beach, daughter of Abel and Mary (Lewis) Beach, of Stratford, CT. "

Children

This information was taken from the website of Provincial Archives of New Brunswick, from newspapers, cemetery records, census, directories, university alumni, and from Rev. Frederick Dibblee's diary. There are many references to the children in the diary, and the nicknames come from there. There is also more information in the newspaper accounts and census returns.

NameDatesNicknameMarriedCareer
John1787-1879JackPhoebe MottOn 1 Jan 1813, Rev. Frederick's diary says "Jack left home with the first draughted militia; ... Jack is Lieutenant."
He was a prosperous farmer and inherited land from his father.
He was a Justice of the Peace
Some accounts refer to him as Col. John Dibblee
William S. I.1790-1874On 1 Jan 1813, Rev. Frederick's diary says "Jack left home with the first draughted militia; William found a substitute for 6 pounds."
He inherited land from his father.
Maria Jane1792-1872unmarriedShe inherited land from her father.
Richard1794-1858Ellen GardnerHe inherited 25 rather than property from from his father.
Elizabeth1796-c.1836BetsyCharles KetchumShe got land from her father as a dowry when she married.
Frederick Beach1797-1874FredElizabeth JenkinsHe inherited 25 rather than property from from his father.
George Jarvis1800-1877See webpage.
Henry Ebenezer1802-1883Charlotte Ketchum,
then Nancy A.
He inherited land from his father.
Deputy Provincial Treasurer
Custom house officer
David Lewis1804-1880LewisHe inherited 25 from his father's will, plus support while he was at school.
Attorney-at-Law; Barrister-at-Law
"usually known as Col. DIBBLE"


Land

Frederick Dibblee (not yet ordained) received a land grant in Parr Town (later St John). At this point, Parr Town was in Noiva Scotia, but it later became part of New Brunswick. See land grants (including a map of where the plot was). Frederick's sister-in-law, Polly Dibblee, widow of his brother, Fyler Dibblee, had the plot next door.

The website W. O. Raymond Scrapbook states "Sergeant Thomas Fowler moved from Woodstock to Northampton about 1793 having sold his grant of 400 acres to Rev. F. Dibblee."

Rev. Frederick Dibblee's older sons got land grants of 250 acres each in 1809, and his younger sons of 200 acres in 1824. Rev. Frederick Dibblee got a land grant of 500 acres in 1822. See Land grants (including a map of where the plots were). Rev. Frederick Dibblee must have been often away on his clerical duties. Still, his diary shows a keen interest in their land and farming.



Career

Frederick Dibblee was born in Stamford Connecitcut, and went to King's College, New York (later Columbia) but he did not get a degree, possibly because the American War of Independence was started. He and his brother Fyler Dibblee supported the British aide, see The Dibblees and the American War of Independence. They both left for Nova Scotia, as Loyalists, and got land in Parr Town (later St John). Fyler Dibblee became depressed, and committed suicide.

In 1788, Frederick Dibblee was appointed to establish a school for the Indians of the upper St. John river. Frederick originally intended to live at Meductic (now called Nackawic). He hired an Indian to paddle him there along the St. John from Fredericton, but he fell asleep, and they ended up at Woodstock. He liked the area, so decided to stay there instead.

By this time, Frederick Dibblee had been a Church of England lay reader for some time. He got ordained but there seems to be a little confusion as to where, or indeed, when. Extracts from first years of NB Church of England says "Loyalists ... prevailed upon Mr. Frederick Dibblee to become their clergyman. Accordingly Mr. Dibblee proceeded to Fredericton, and thence to St. John, N. B., by canoe, there being no roads at that early period. At St John he took passage in a schooner for Halifax, N. S., where he was ordained Deacon by the Bishop of Nova Scotia,in the year 1791. Three months were occupied by Mr. Dibblee in his Journey to and from Halifax, during which time his family never heard a word from him." However the History of Trinity Church, Saint John says that the church "was consecrated by Bishop Chas. Ingis on Sunday, August 19th, 1792, who, at the same time, ordained Rev. Frederick Dibblee and Rev. Oliver Arnold. There is little doubt, that it was the first ordination held in New Brunswick." This presumably refers to a second ordination, as Rector of a parish.

Rev. Frederick Dibblee remained Rector of Woodstock parish for the rest of his life. He kept a diary which shows the day-to-day activities of farming, the social life of the area and the way that the river was used for transport, by canoe or by sleigh. Click here for extracts from the diary. Click here for a map of places mentioned in thediary.

Since Rev. Frederick Dibblee was the first rector of Woodstock, and an early figure in he New Brunswick Church of England, there are several biographies of him. See W. O. Raymond Accounts, Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online and History of Church of England in New Brunswick



Will

Taken from the website of Provincial Archives of New Brunswick - Wallace Hale's Early New Brunswick Probate, 1785-1835.

Rev. Frederic Dibblee: Parish of Woodstock, York County. Will dated 16 May 1825, proved 22 June 1826. Wife, un-named, her maintenance. Property divided among sons John, William S. I., Henry C. and daughter Maria Jane DIBBLEE. Daughter Elizabeth DIBBLEE 5. Sons Richard, Frederic B., George J. and David Lewis DIBBLEE each 25. Son David Lewis support until he leaves school. Sons John DIBBLEE and William S. I. DIBBLEE executors. Witnesses: Nancy W. RICE, Charles PEABODY, Charles RAYMOND.

This will suggests that by 1825, Rev Frederick Dibblee realised that some of his sons were farmers (John, William and Henry) so they could inherit his land. Maria also inherited land, as a dowry (although in fact she never married). Elizabeth had already had her dowry, see newspaper account, so she gets the smallest inheritance. George ended up with a legal career by this time, and Frederick B. and David both got degrees - in fact, David became a barrister as well. So none of these needed land. I'm not quite sure why Richard does not get land.

Click here for the inscriptions of the graves of Rev. Frederick Dibblee and his wife.