Index

Alexander Mackay Geddes


Son of John Geddes (III)
Brother of Adam Gordon Geddes

Alexander Mackay Geddes is not a direct ancestor of mine.

Born: 1794      Died: 1824 in Accra, West Coast Africa

Father: John Geddes (III)
Brothers:
John Geddes (IV)
Adam Gordon Geddes
David Geddes
James Geddes

Alexander Geddes was unmarried and had no children.

I do not have any pictures or photos of him.

In this letter, Alexander's brother, John Geddes IV is writing to their father John Geddes III. The date is 3 Dec 1815. The battle of Waterloo was on 18 June 1815, which is why, I presume, John Geddes IV was in France. This letter is partly about Alexander.

3 Dec 1815 from John Geddes IV to his father John Geddes III, addressed from Maisons near S. Germain en Saye (Paris).

My dear Father,

I wrote to you on the 29th. Alexr I suppose has marched as I have not heard from him since he left me on that day. The 2nd 59th & other Battns are on the march to the coast to embark for England. Our 3rd Battn. have given us men to complete us in effective & serviceable soldiers to 1000. They commence their march with the remainer on the 10th for Boulogne & embark, so that they most likely will be reduced by the 24th of this or next month. They will have notwithstanding about 300- to give to the 2nd which I hope will keep them embodied. We move into S. Germain on the 5th & the prevailing idea is that next month early we move towards the frontiers. Cambray is mentioned as our destination. Nicolson will probably be placed on half-pay with the 3rd Bn.

I have got at Gr. Grant for Alexr in the following way. Sir John Maclean the other day was told by a friend of the Dr. that he wished veru much to be introduced to his acquantance. Sir John said he would be very happy to have that pleasure & in consequence they are to meet for that purpose some of these days at the house of the gentleman to whom the Dr. had expressed his wish. Sir John desired me to give him Alexr.'s name & the time he had been out here & that tho' he never saw Dr. Grant yet, he would take the opportunity of speaking to him about Alexr. which might perhaps get him appointed to an Asst. Surgeonry before it came to his regular term. The reduction will prevent a vacancy for some time in the 27th, & indeed another regiment would be preferable.

Sir John requests me to forward the enclised thro' you, he takes the 3rd Bn. home but I believe will join us as soon as the Brevet comes out. I am busy settling accounts of the men transferred etc.

Yours always most affectionately J.G.


In this letter, Alexander Mackay Geddes is writing to his brother, John Geddes IV

16 Apr 1816 from Alexander Mackay Geddes, Saint Denis, addressed to Captain Geddes 1st Battn, 27th Regt, 1st Division, Morchie, near Cambray, France

My dear John,

I received orders today to proceed immediately to the Headquarters of the British Cavalry at Mount Cassel in Flanders to act as Assistant Surgeon in the 3rd Brigade of Cavalry, so I leave this tomorrow morning if I can get my passport in time. I shall pass through Cambray in my way, I think I can be at Cambray the 5th days march. I am obliqued to go alone on horseback as my servant is in Hospital sick. I am to report myself at Cassel & then join the Regt. at Hazelbrouck. I should like to see you at Cambray as I will not have time to remain more than a day. I am to send my baggage by Dilligence to Cambray & I can then contrive to send it to Cassel. The Hospl. moves after the 24th. My servant is to report to you, & you can easily direct him to me. I have not had time to call again at Mr. Matel's(?). I called today at the Calais Dilligence Office but your box had not arrived. The Depy. Inspector says that I shall stand a good chance for promotion in the Cavalry, however I am not very sanguine in my expectation. I shall loikely want some money when I see you.

My dear John, Your Affectionate Brother Alaxander M. Geddes


Death of Alexander Mackay Geddes


20 Oct 1824 copy of letter from John Geddes IV from Newport, Isle of Wight to Major Chisholm, R. African Corps

Sir,

It is under the most painful feelings I now address you. About three weeks ago, the very distressing accounts reached his Father & friends of the death of Dr. Geddes, who had been detained on the West Coast of Africa on his way to England from the Cape of Good Hope. This distressing event appears to have taken place at Acra on the 21st July last. It was never for a moment intended that my Brother should in any way be attached to, or delayed on the African Station, & I would fain hope that the measure of his detention for so long a time so melancholy in its result & which must now be a matter of such deep regret to his afflicted Father and brothers, was one of the most absolute necessity. We had been most anxiously looking for his arrival & orders have been gone some time for Dr Geddes being allowed to proceed by the first conveyance to England - alas too late.

As we have not recd. any particulars of my lamented Brother's illness, it would be obliging if you would be so good as write to his Father or to me on this melancholy occasion, & say what effects Dr. Geddes was possessed of & in whose care they are. His Father would wish that his papers, watch, sword, Gun & any articles which it might be thought his friends would wih to preserve should be sent to England, & that any instructions Dr. Geddes may have left should be communicated. I have no doubt that you will be kind enough to comply with this sad request.

Dr Geddes's Father's address is:
      John Geddes Esq., Minto Street, Nwington, Edinburgh.
My address will be to the care of
      James Ashley Esq., 44 Charing Cross, London

I have the honour to be Sir your very Obedt. Servt.

J. Geddes Capt. 27 Regt.


20 Oct 1824 copy of a similar letter from John Geddes IV from Newport, Isle of Wight to J.A. Schetley (?) Esq., Dr. Insp. of Hospitals, West Coast of Africa

Sir,

I trust in your indulgence in now addressing you, which I do under the most painful feelings. About three weeks ago, the very distressing accounts reached me of the death of my Brother, Dr. Geddes who had been detained on the West Coast of Africa on his way to England from the Cape of Good Hope. This melancholy event appears to have taken place at Acra on the 21st July. I would fain hope that the extraordinary measure of his detention on reaching Cape Coast, so melancholy in its result, which must now be a matter of so deep regret to his Afflicted Father & Brothers was really one of absolute necessity, as it was never for an instant intended he should be attached to the African Station. We had been most anxiously expecting his arrival in England & orders have been gone some time for his return, but alas too late. My Brother in his letters from Sierra Leone mentioned in warmest terms the very kind attentions you shewed him on his arrival there for which I offer you my sincere thanks & I feel convinced my Dear Brother not an unworthy object of your esteem. I have not heard any particulars or received any letters respecting my poor Brother's illness. I have written a few lines to Majr. Chisholm on the subject. Probably as you are Head of the Medical department & I understand having been, if not now at Cape Coast or Acra, you would be so kind as write to Dr Geddes's Father or to me on this occasion & say what property Dr. Geddes was possessed of & in whose care it is. His Father would wish that his papers, watch, sword, Gun & other articles which it might be thought his friends would wish to preserve were sent to England & that any instructions he may have left should be communicated. I hope you will be kind enough to comply with this sad request.

Dr Geddes's Father's address is:
      John Geddes Esq., Minto Street, Nwington, Edinburgh.
My address will be to the care of
      James Ashley Esq., 44 Charing Cross, London


24 Oct 1824 copy of letter with which the above two letters of 20th Oct 1824 were enclosed, from John Geddes IV from Newport, Isle of Wight to Captain Smith, 2d W.I.Regt.

Dear Sir,

I enclose two letters for the West of Africa, one for Mr. Schetley(?), Dr. Inspector of Hospitals & one for Majr. Chisholm of the R. African Corps, which you were so good as (to) say you would take charge of. They are for the purpose of ascertaining the particulars of the illness of Dr. Geddes, the distressing accounts of whose death reached his Father & friends about three weeks ago. No letters have been recd., but this melancholy event appears to have taken place at Acra on the 21st July. Dr Geddes was on his way to England from the Cape of Good Hope. His Father would wish ... (as above) ... should be communicated. I have also begged in the letters enclosed to be informed what property Dr Geddes was possessed of & in whose charge it is. Should you have an opportunity of inquiring at Cape Coast or Acra, perhaps you would have the kindness to write to me, you may address your letter either to the Isle of Wight or to the care of James Ashley Esq., 44 Charing Cross, London.

It was never intended my Brother should be attached to the African Station, & the measure of his detention so fatal in its results. I must ever deeply regret. I truly & sincerely wish you may enjoy your health while you are employed on the African Coast, & trust in your excusing the trouble I am giving you.

I remain Dear Sir, Your faithful servant

J. Geddes Captn 27th. Regt.