Bucks Point Lace Patterns

Most of this website is Torchon lace, with a square grid. Sometimes I have tried designing lace inspired by Bucks Point. Most of them are not traditional Bucks Point designs, although they use a hexagonal grid and Bucks Point ideas. The simple pieces are on the Beginner's section
On other pagesStraight piecesMats and corners on other pages
Bucks fans
Gimp
Honeycomb
Small honeycomb flowers
Daisies
Flowers and fans
Cow Parsley
Garland
Another garland
Zigzag
Peacock
Firebird
Bees
Flowers
More flowers
Yet more flowers
Hearts
Roses
Roses 2
Roses 3
Ground and solid
Cow Parsley mat
Wild rose
3D cubes mat
Flower mat (twelve petals)
Small flower mat (six petals)
Bucks Point corner with 3 flowers
Bucks Point zigzag corner

Flowers 3 photo

Small honeycomb flowers

I have designed some Torchon flowers here. However, for proper flower patterns, it is probably better to use a hexagonal grid. This pattern uses ideas from Bucks Point lace, but it is not a real Bucks Point design, as it uses no gimps and no picots. A gimp is a single thicker thread which is used to outline certain parts of the lace. You could use one round the flowers and leaves in this design. Picots are small loops, and Bucks Point lace often uses them along the edge. You could use them in this pattern if you wish.

I left both these out as I wanted to try a simpler design. The centre of each flower is a cloth stitch diamond, which is surrounded by a circle of honeycomb net. I have marked in where each pair of threads go, to make the working easier. The leaves are also cloth stitch and the net between is Bucks Point ground. There is a cloth footside on each edge, as this is an insertion. When working the lace, use Bucks Point ground (half stitch and twist, pin) where two yellow threads meet, and honeycomb net (half stitch, pin, half stitch) where yellow meets blue, or two blue cross.

The hexagonal grid means that we have a pattern of hexagons (6 sided figures) rather than diamonds (4 sided), and there are no right angles, which gives a much more natural appearance.

This pattern uses 22 pairs of bobbins.

Flowers 3 pattern

Daisy 1 pattern

Daisies

This is another attempt to produce some flowers. I think they look a bit like daisies! Each flower either has cloth stitch petals with a half stitch centre, or vice versa. Perhaps cloth stitch petals show up better than half stitch. The ground is Bucks Point ground, with a simple footside. There is a double Torchon ground stitch between the petals.

This pattern has vertical straight lines. These need extra pinholes, not on the standard grid. The pricking pattern has these holes, but since I discovered this while working the lace, the photo shows a mixture of using the extra holes and leaving them out. You might notice that the centre of the top flower has less rows than the bottom flower.

28 pairs of bobbins.

Daisy 1 photo

Daisy 2 photo

Flowers and fans

This was an attempt at a more complicated pattern. The daisies are similar, although they are simple hexagons. I think that they don't look as good as the previous ones.

The headside is partly cloth fans, and partly part twisted fan.

I started by putting a wiggle between the daisies at the bottom, near the footside. But it doesn't look very impressive, so I put a cloth stitch diamond instead.

This pattern uses 21 pairs of bobbins.

Daisy 2 pattern

Cow parsley

Cow parsley Cow parsley

In England, in May, the cow parsley flowers. This is rather an ugly name for a beautiful flower. It's an umbellifer, with clusters of tiny white flowers in regular patterns, in a domed shape. An alternate name is Queen Anne's lace, so I couldn't resist trying to design a lace featuring it. Here it is. There are the regular white flowers (which are holes in the lace) above a mess of leaves. I must admit that all those leaves are quite challenging. I had to undo bits of the lace several times! See a mat in a similar design.

It uses honeycomb net for the flowers and zigzags for the leaves, with a standard Bucks Point headside.

17 bobbins (I think!)


Garland

Garland

This is a simple pattern of crossing garlands.

There are Bucks Point headsides on both sides. Outside the garlands is Bucks Point ground. The garlands are surrounded by gimps. They are the hexagon of honeycomb net. It can be a little tricky working out where the threads leave and join the individual parts of the garland, so click here for a further description. Inside the garlands are alternately flowers and diamonds. The diamonds are cloth stitch and half stitch, with a few stitches of Bucks Point ground to fill the gaps between.

22 pairs of bobbins + 4 gimps

Garland

Double zig zag

Bucks point style zig-zags

This is a Bucks Point style design, but purists would not approve of a few things. There is no gimp, normally the net would be much wider, and the shapes would be more flowing. So I think that you could say this is some Bucks point as designed by someone who normally does Torchon!

There are cloth fans as headside. They have the worker pair twisted before working the edge passives. There are various thin cloth stitch zigzags. These outline honeycomb and half stitch ground. There is bucks point ground (using half stitch and two twists for a firmer ground). The footside is cloth stitch footside with two pairs of passives. This is usual for Bucks Point.

17 pairs of bobbins

Double zig zag

Peacock

Peacock

I saw a Bucks Point design which claimed to be an eagle, but I thought it looked like a peacock. So I tried to produce a simpler version of it.

There are Bucks Point headsides on both sides, and Bucks Point ground. There are five cloth diamonds between the peacocks.

Each peacock is a hexagon of honeycomb net, outlined with two gimps. The gimp starts one side of the peacock, humg from its own pin. One gimp goes round the top, and the other goes round the bottom, then heads for the centre of the lace to make the peacock's head. Originally I tried to put a beak in, but it didn't work, so I did a picot for the beak instead. the gimps join up, pass, overlap each other for a few stitches, then get cut off (and trimmed neatly later). For the last peacock, I worked out that I could do a beak (without a picot) if the peacock faced the opposite direction, and there was two new gimps, just for the head of the peacock. I show this in the pattern. I made these secondary gimps a different colour, which doesn't show up well.

The gimps in this design are actually each pairs of sparkly thread (It is a peacock, after all!) So rather than lifting the gimp over and under the other threads, the gimps are worked through the other threads with cloth stitch and twist. You could have single thick gimps if you prefer.

20 pairs of bobbins + 2 gimps (plus 2 more gimps for last peacock)

Peacock

Firebird

Firebird

This is a similar idea, but this time based on a pattern called Firebird (hence the colours). The gimps are single sparkly threads - it might be better to make them pairs of threads!

There is a Bucks Point headside but it is curvy. On the straight parts, a pair of threads comes through the lace, goes through the passives, makes a picot and returns through the passives to the lace. On the sloping part (upwards), a pair of threads comes in the the lace, goes through the passives, makes a picot and back through the passives to become the inner passives. On the downwards slope, the inner pair of passives did the same in reverse. Between the firebirds, there is Bucks Point ground. The footside has a gimp instead of passives. It is joined, at different times, by one, then both, of the other gimps.

Each firebird is surrounded by honeycomb net, outlined with a gimp. The gimp starts from the footside and returns to it. The firebird is surrounded by another gimp (also starting from and returning to the footside). The body of the firebird is done with cloth stitch - the worker threads go round the gimp surrounding the firebird.

15 pairs of bobbins + 3 gimps

Firebird

Bees Bucks Point photo

Bees

This is based on two different traditional patterns.

There is a curvy Bucks Point headside like the previous pattern. The number of passive pairs in the footside varies from one to three. The pattern within the headside is flowers. The petals are half stitch surrounded by gimps. The centre is honeycomb and the background is kat stitch. There is Bucks Point ground with bees in. These are also surrounded by gimps. The wings are gimps. The centre is honeycomb and the body a line of Torchon ground (so it looks different to the Bucks Point ground). The footside is cloth stitch footside with two pairs of passives.

The gimps need a little thought. The bees are OK. Start a pair of gimps for each bee. Circle the top wing, cross the gimps, surround the body, cross gimps, circle the bottom wing and finish the gimps off. The gimps round the flowers go through the whole piece of lace - all four gimps. This means that they have to be doubled up for the first and last petal of each flower. Keep the gimps in the same order within the flower, and when they are crossed over, lift two gimps over the other two. It is also tricky between the petals. One gimp on each siide surrounds the centre of the flower and the other circles each petal. But the petals are separated, either by one stitch or several. One pair of normal threads tends to come from the centre of the flower, over-and-under both gimps, does a stitch, then returns, again under-and-over both gimps, to the centre. This pinches both gimps together at that point. They then separate again to go their different ways.

The petals sometimes have edges parallel to the edge. The pattern gives extra holes in these, which are unsupported by pairs joining or leaving the petal. This makes the petals quite dense, and also makes sure that you have the same number of pins on each side of the petal. There are three ways of working these - your choice! You can leave these extra pinholes out, which means that you will need to work in the direction of the extra pinhole first (or you will run out of holes on one side!) Or you can work it with the pinholes that I have shown. This makes some of the rows a little floppy at that point, as you end the row, pin, and work back again, and this edge is then unsupported at that point. The last method, which I (mostly) used is to use the extra holes, but at that point take the workers not just through all the passives, but also over the gimp as well. Pin inside both the workers and the gimp, then bring the workers back under and over the gimp to do the next row. This means that the gimp itself supoorts the end of the row.

30 pairs of bobbins + 6 gimps

Bees Bucks Point pattern

Flowers

Flowers Bucks Point photo

A simple quick strip.

There is a straight Bucks Point headside on each side, with two passive pairs. There are Bucks Point flowers which have solid centres, and blocks of honeycomb, each surrounded by two gimps, one on each side, and crossing over between them. The rest is Bucks Point ground.

In fact I used a pair of sparkly threads for each gimp. The sparkle doesn't show much. I used the same sparkly thread for the passives in the headside. Not very successful, I'm afraid.

16 pairs of bobbins + 2 gimps

Flowers Bucks Point pattern

Yet another flowery edging

Another flowery edging photo

This is an even simpler version of the one above.

There is a straight Bucks Point headside on each side, with two passive pairs. There are Bucks Point flowers which have solid centres, with gimps, one on each side, and crossing over between them. The rest is Bucks Point ground.

While simple, I think this pattern is effective.

14 pairs of bobbins + 2 gimps

Another flowery edging pattern

Another garland

Another garland photo

There is a Bucks Point headside with just a single passive. The footside is cloth stitch footside with two pairs of passives. There is the usual Bucks Point ground. There are two garlands but they don't cross over. They are surrounded by two lots of gimps, one marked in red, and one by blue. Between the garlands is honeycomb, with half stitch diamonds. It was worked in very fine thread.

30 pairs of bobbins + 4 gimps

Another garland pattern

Another flowery edging

Another flowery edging photo

There is a Bucks Point headside with two passives. Between the shapes, a pair crosses the passives and an extra pair, without a picot, round a pin, then back into the pattern. This gives a slight wave to the edge.

The footside is cloth stitch footside with two pairs of passives. There is the usual Bucks Point ground.

The edge is made of a flower, a honeycomb shape and a bead, following each other to make a symmetrical pattern. They are outlined with two gimps. These are in the pattern throughout. They overlap on either side of the flower.

I made a long length of this (for me) for a present - 18 inches, which was 9 repeats of the pattern. This took me around 15 hours!

17 pairs of bobbins + 2 gimps

Another flowery edging pattern

Hearts

Hearts Bucks Point photo

There are Bucks Point headside with two passives, on each edge. There is honeycomb ground. The two large hearts are in half stitch, and the small one is in cloth stitch.

This was made for my new great neice and her parents. It is a first attempt at hearts in Bucks Point. The shape still works, although the small one is not as plain. The difference in size between the small and large hearts was to fit in with the homeycomb background.

The start and end are both straight across, with a pair from one of the edges worked across all bobbins in cloth stitch, twice. This continues the passives on both edges, to frame the lace.

20 pairs of bobbins

Hearts Bucks Point pattern

Roses

Roses Bucks Point photo

This was an attempt to design and make a piece with roses along the edge. I wanted to have a simple headside rather than the usual Bucks Point edge with picots, and I also wanted to design a piece without gimps.

The footside is cloth stitch footside with two pairs of passives. There is the usual Bucks Point ground.

In the headside, there are half-stitch fans which represents leaves. The edge petals of the flower are similar at the edge, except in cloth stitch. However, they have a straight edge. The other petals are also shapes worked in cloth stitch, with honeycomb ground in the centre.

workers joining shape to ground

Since there are no gimps, there is a problem at the edges of the closely worked areas, which are normally outlined by the gimps. The diagonal edges are OK. The problem is with the edges parallel to the footside/headside. Some are next to Bucks Point ground, and some to honeycomb. The workers leave the shape at alternate pinholes, twist twice, then join with the ground. If this is honeycomb, then the workers do a cloth stitch with the pair from the honeycomb, twist twice, pin, then cloth and two twists back into the shape. (This is to make the junction at the pin look like a honeycomb stitch.) If it is Bucks Point ground, then the workers do a cloth stitch with the ground pair, then pin. This swaps over the worker pair with the pair from the ground.

workers joining shape to ground

22 pairs of bobbins

Roses Bucks Point pattern

Roses 2

Roses Bucks Point photo

Another attempt to design and make a piece with roses along the edge, without gimps.

The footside is cloth stitch footside with two pairs of passives. There is the usual Bucks Point ground.

The roses are similar to the previous pattern, if slightly different in shape, cloth stitch shapes with honeycomb ground in the centre. They are joined with half stitch zigzags and diamonds representing stems and buds.

16 pairs of bobbins

Roses Bucks Point pattern

Roses 3

Roses Bucks Point photo

Another attempt to design and make a piece with roses along the edge. This time there is a gimp, but not to outline the pattern, but to make a stem for the roses and leaves.

The footside is plaited edge footside. There is the usual Bucks Point ground.

The roses are similar to the previous pattern, if slightly different in shape, cloth stitch shapes, but with double Torchon ground in the centre. They are joined with half stitch diamonds representing leaves.

17 pairs of bobbins + 1 gimp

Roses Bucks Point pattern

Ground and solid

Ground and solid Bucks Point photo

This was just an exploration of the differences between solid half stitch and half stitch ground (or lattice stitch).

There are diagonal strips of the two, with a cloth footside at each edge.

You can see that the solid stitch is more solid, with far more stitches. Also, there are individual threads running across the strip, as well as the diagonal threads. The half stitch ground is less dense, and has individual threads running down the lace.

You can also see a mistake in the solid half stitch!

The solid half stitch looks a little strange, because this is worked in Bucks Point grid rather than Torchon grid. This makes the working even more dense.

14 pairs of bobbins

Ground and solid Bucks Point pattern

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© Jo Edkins 2002