Ribbons

These are very narrow patterns. You could use them as ribbons, either by themselves or sewing them onto 'proper' ribbins. As they are so narrow, they don't take as long to work. Some of them are done in a single colour, and some in more than one.

Single colourTwo coloursThree coloursThree colours
(5 pairs)(6 pairs)(6 pairs)(8 pairs)
Close triangles
Spaced triangles
Close half spiders
Same side half spiders
Spaced half spiders
Torchon ground
Torchon double ground
Torchon ground offset
Torchon double ground offset
Torchon ground
Torchon double ground
Torchon ground offset
Torchon double ground offset
Rose ground
Spiders
Spiders offset
Triangular ground
Triangular ground offset


Single colour

Here I have experimented with various grounds to see what they are like as a ribbon. I have given my own comments on the results, but you may disagree! You could try using metallic or sparkly thread if you prefer. In these patterns, use Torchon ground in between the other grounds to fill gaps.

These patterns use only one colour, and only 5 pairs. They have no footside.

Close triangles ribbon photo

Close triangles

This is a line of triangular ground facing in opposite directions.

The pattern is a little hard to distinguish, and the ribbon is likely to twist.

Close triangles ribbon design

Spaced triangles ribbon photo

Spaced triangles

This is also triangular ground facing in opposite directions, but spaced out more.

This is better, I think.

Spaced triangles ribbon design

Close half spider ribbon photo

Close half spiders

These are half spiders facing in opposite directions.

The half spiders are close together, which creates an interesting pattern.

Close half spider ribbon design

Same side half spider ribbon photo

Same side half spiders

These half spiders all face the same side.

Not so good, I think, since all you can see are the holes.

Same side half spider ribbon design

Spaced half spider ribbon photo

Spaced half spiders

These are half spiders facing in opposite directions.

The half spiders are further apart. This means that the half spiders can be seen better.

Spaced half spider ribbon design


Below I have tried using more than one colour. Not only does this give some interesting effects, but it does show how different stitches work, if you are new to lacemaking.

The previous patterns tended to twist, so the following have single twisted footside. I'm afraid that they still tend to twist, though! It might be a good idea to sew them onto a backing ribbon, for example, or glue them to a card.


Two colours

Very simple patterns using 6 pairs - 2 colours.

Torchon ground ribbon

Torchon ground ribbon

This has just one Torchon ground stitch in the middle, between the footsides.

There are 2 sparkly pairs, and 6 red pairs, making 6 in all. The colours are balanced, and the sparkly pairs show how they swap over in the middle.

Torchon ground ribbon

Torchon double ground ribbon

Torchon double ground ribbon

The same as before, but with a Torchon double ground stitch in the middle.

You may recognise this from one of the beginner patterns. The two colours give a different appearance, though.

Torchon double ground ribbon

Torchon ground offset ribbon

Torchon ground offset ribbon

This has just one Torchon ground stitch in the middle again, but now the sparkly pairs are offset from each other. So they do not cross over in the middle, but at one (or the other) edge.

Torchon ground offset ribbon

Torchon double ground offset ribbon

Torchon ground offset ribbon

The same as before, but with a Torchon double ground stitch in the middle. The sparkly pairs are offset from each other. The double stitch in the middle makes them double back, which gives a different effect.

Torchon double ground offset ribbon


Three colours

Very simple patterns using 6 pairs - 3 colours. The extra colour means that you can see even more about how the pairs move through the pattern.

Torchon ground ribbon

Torchon ground ribbon

This has just one Torchon ground stitch in the middle, between the footsides.

There are 2 sparkly pairs, and 6 red pairs, making 6 in all. The colours are balanced, and the sparkly pairs show how they swap over in the middle.

Torchon ground ribbon

Torchon double ground ribbon

Torchon double ground ribbon

The same as before, but with a Torchon double ground stitch in the middle.

The extra colour shows that each coloured pair stays on its own side of the lace.

Torchon ground ribbon

Torchon ground offset ribbon

Torchon ground offset ribbon

One Torchon ground stitch in the middle, between the footsides.

Since the sparkly pairs are offset, they chase each other across the lace.

Torchon ground offset ribbon

Torchon double ground offset ribbon

Torchon double ground offset ribbon

Torchon double ground stitch in the middle.

This gives a wiggle with one colour on one edge and the other on the other edge.

Torchon ground offset ribbon


Three colours

Slightly more complicated patterns using 8 pairs - 2 colours plus a background colour.

Rose ground ribbon

Rose ground ribbon

Rose ground in the middle.

The coloured pairs start on their own side. They swap sides at each "rose". There is a more complicated versions here.

Rose ground ribbon
Spider ribbon

Spider ribbon

Spider in the middle.

The coloured pairs are balanced on both sides. This makes them swap over, with alternate spiders being each colour.

Spider ribbon
Spider offset ribbon

Spider offset ribbon

Spider in the middle.

The coloured pairs are offset. This makes zigzags.

Spider offset ribbon
Triangular ground ribbon

Triangular ground ribbon

Triangular ground in the middle.

The coloured pairs are balanced on both sides. This makes them swap over, with alternate spiders being each colour. It does end up looking a bit like the spiders, but there's a bar in the middle rather than the legs coming to a point.

Triangular ground ribbon
Triangular ground offset ribbon

Triangular ground offset ribbon

Triangular ground in the middle.

The coloured pairs are offset. This makes zigzags, again a bit like the spiders.

Triangular ground offset ribbon

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© Jo Edkins 2012