Main index --- Minerals list Sulphur

Elements

Most minerals are compounds, which means that they are combinations of elements. Some minerals are elements by themselves. This means that their chemical formula is very simple (see below).

These elements are, of course, part of other minerals as well. There is a whole section on copper compounds. Carbon (graphite) happens in many minerals, particularly combined with oxygen. Sulphur likes combining with metals. Gold isn't reactive, which is why it doesn't rust or tarnish. This means that you do not get gold compounds.

Copper
Copper
Graphite
Graphite
Diamond
Diamond
Sulphur
Sulphur
Silver
Silver
Gold
Gold

What the letters mean

List of elements in order of symbol
Index of elements by name
Index of elements by atomic number
Most common elements in the earth's crust

Each mineral has a chemical formula, and you will see them throughout this web site. You may wonder what this collection of letters means.

A mineral is a compound. Each molecule of it is made up of a number of atoms, from different elements. The letters give the element, and the numbers give the number of atoms of that element there are in a molecule. A few minerals, like those above, just contain a single element, so you can see what they look like, but most elements don't happen by themselves in minerals - in fact, some are gases.

It is sometimes strange to see what elements combine to make a compound. Sodium, a soft metal which fizzes violently when put into water, and chlorine, a poisonous gas, make sodium chloride (NaCl), otherwise known as common salt!

The elements are usually arranged in the Periodic Table. Since you can find the Periodic Table on the Web, I decided to give a simple list of just the elements that are in the minerals on this website. Each element starts with its symbol or letter/s. If these sometimes look funny, it's because they can be the initials of their Latin name rather than the English one. This is followed by its atomic number, which gives some idea of its weight, and also helps to find it in a Periodic Table. The links take you to a mineral that contains that element. Hydrogen and oxygen don't have links, as they are in so many formulae.

List of elements in the minerals in this website, by symbol

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

Ag47SilverShiny precious metal
Al13AluminiumA shiny light metal
As33ArsenicUsed in semiconductors and poisons
Au79GoldYellow precious metal
B5BoronDark brown powder. Used in borax, a water softener
Ba56BariumVery reactive metal
Be4BerylliumSilvery white metal. Used to make transitors
C6CarbonUsually a soft black solid, except when it's a diamond
Ca20CalciumA silvery grey metal, which turns white quickly in air, and fizzes in water
Cl17ChlorinePale yellowish-green gas. Used in swimming pools. Similar to fluorine
Co27CobaltA hard metal, used to plate other metals
Cr24ChromiumA shiny metal, used to make permanent magnets
Cu29CopperA pinkish brown metal
Fe26IronGrey metal
F9FluorinePale greenish-yellow gas
H1HydrogenA colourless flammable gas. Very light
Hg80MercuryLiquid silver metal
K3PotassiumSilvery highly reactive metal. If you put it in water it burns.
Li3LithiumMetal used to make batteries
Mg12MagnesiumSilvery-white metal used in flash bulbs
Mn25ManganeseMetal used to make steel (with iron)
Mo42MolybdenumSilvery metal used as a solid lubricant
Na11SodiumA soft reactive metal. Used in street lights
Nb41NiobiumGrey metal
O8OxygenA colourless gas. Essential for life. Tends to make things catch fire
P15PhosphorusOff-white waxy solid, prone to catch fire
Pb82LeadDull grey poisonous heavy metal
S16SulphurSmelly yellow solid
Sb51AntimonyMetal used in the past for medicine and cosmetics
Sn50TinMetal used to stop other metals from rusting
Si14SiliconGreyish metallic looking solid. Used in computers
Sr38StrontiumSilvery white metal. Used in fireworks
Ta73TantalumSilvery metal
Ti22TitaniumMetal with a very high melting point. Used to make high-speed planes
U92UraniumBluish white radioactive metal. Used for nuclear powere and atom bombs
V23VanadiumSilvery grey metal. Used to make sulphuric acid
Zn30ZincShiny metal. Used to make brass (with copper)
Zr40ZirconiumSteel-white metal. Zircalloy (with tin, chromium and nickel) is corrosion-resistant.

Index of elements in my minerals by name

Aluminium
Antimony
Arsenic
Barium
Beryllium
Boron
Calcium
Carbon
Chlorine
Chromium
Cobalt
Copper
Fluorine
Gold
Hydrogen
Iron
Lead
Lithium
Magnesium
Manganese
Mercury
Molybdenum
Niobium
Oxygen
Phosphorus
Potassium
Silicon
Silver
Sodium
Sulphur
Strontium
Tantalum
Tin
Titanium
Uranium
Vanadium
Zinc
Zirconium

Index of elements in the minerals on this website by atomic number

This is arranged in the form of the periodic table, but there are gaps, since my collection of minerals does not contain every element. The noble gases won't combine with any other element, so don't form part of natural minerals. Some elements are not found in Nature, and some are very rare. Surprisingly enough, nitrogen is in very few minerals, although every living creature contains nitrogen. Since I have only included elements that exist in my mineral collection, there are a few common elements missing. I'm annoyed I haven't got a nickle compound, for example!

1
3 4 5 6 8 9
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
19 20 22 23 24 25 26 27 29 30 33
38 4041 42 47 5051
56 73 79 80 82
92

The most common elements in the earth's crust