Jug Ruler Scales

Historic documents

Scales Ruler Jug

Here are various documents about weights and measures from different times. They used to be on different parts of the website, but I've decided to pull them together onto one page. I have tried to give dates where I know them, but this may be inaccurate.


The cry in Stourbridge Fair

Stourbridge Fair in Cambridge used to be the largest fair in Europe in medieval times. At the start of the fair, the Cry explained the rules governing the fair. This Cry is circa 1506 or 1514/15. Spelling and punctuation has been modernised. I like the fact that they had 'ropey ale' in those days, also that 'freaking' was disapproved of! Most of the units are recognisable, and can be looked up on the rest of this website. However 'pottle' is new to me. It is apparently half a gallon. It looks af if the last few items were after-thoughts, or perhaps amendments. Not only do they seem in the wrong order, and repeat what was said previously (in the case of the butcher's rotten meat), they also refer to the fair as a market instead.


We charge & strictly command in the name of the King of England our Sovereiqn Lord & in the name of my Lord Chancellor of the University of Cambridge that all manner of scholars, scholars' servants & all other persons in this fair and the precincts of the same keep the King's peace & make no fray, cry, awtasse, freaking or any other noise by the which insurrections, conventicles, or gathering of people may be made in this fair to the trouble, vexing and disquieting of the King's liege people or letting of the officers of the University to exercise their offices under the pain of imprisonment & further punishment as the offence shall require.

Also we charge and command that all manner of Scholars and Scholars' servants wear no weapon to make any fray upon any of the King's people neither in coming nor in going from this fair under the pain of banishment.

Also we require and command that all manner of strangers that come to this fair, that they leave their weapon at their inns that the King's peace may be the better kept and for the occasion ensuing of the same, under the pain of forfeiting of their weapons, and for their punishment as the offence shall require. And that every innkeeper give that warning to his guests at their first coming: to leave their Weapons in their inns under the pain of punishment.

Also we charge and command that all common women and misbehaving people avoid and withdraw themselves out of this fair and the precincts of the same immediately after this cry, that the King's subjects may be the more quiet, and good rule may be the better maintained, under the pain of imprisonment.

Also we charge and command in the King's name of England, and in the name of my Lord Chancellor of the University, that all manner of bakers that bake to sell that they bake 2 loaves for one penny and a farthing for another of good paste, good boulted and lawful size after as grain goeth in the market. And every baker that baketh to sell have a mark upon his bread whereby it may be known who did bake it under the pain of forfeiture of his bread.

Also that all bakers shall obtain and keep such sizes of bread as shall be given them by the officers of the university under the pain of forfeiture of their bread if it hap any baker to be found faulty in any article pertaining to unlawful bread according to the King's laws, that then such bakers after three monitions shall be imprisoned and punished according the laws of our Sovereign Lord the King.

Also that no brewers sell into this fair nor anywhere within the precincts of the university, a barrel Of good ale above two shillings, nor a barrel of hostel ale above twelve pence, no long ale, no red ale, no ropey ale, but good and wholesome ale for man's body under the pain of forfeiture, and that every brewer, have a mark upon his barrel whereby it may be known whose it is under the pain of imprisonment and fine at the discretion of the officers of the university.

Also that every barrel of good ale hold and contain fourteen gallons, thirteen gallons of clear ale and one gallon for the rest and the hogget seven gallons that is to say six gallons and one pottle Of clear ale and the residue of rest under the pain of forfeiture and for the punishment after the discretion of the officers of the university.

Also we command that the beer brewers shall sell a kilderkin of double beer in this fair for two shillings and a kilderkin of single beer for twelve pence.

Also that no tipper nor gannaker sell in the said fair, nor within the precincts of the university, a gallon of good ale above four pence nor a gallon of hostel ale above two pence, And the beer brewers a gallon above four pence and a gallon of single beer above two pence under the pain of twelve pence for every time.

Also where great detriments, hurts and deceits hath been to the King's subjects in times past by reason of false and unlawful measures brought by potters and other persons to be sold and bought in this fair and the precincts of the same in avoiding therefore the said hurts and untrue measures, we strictly charge and command that every potter and all other persons that bring such pots to be sold in this fair or precincts of the same that they and all other from henceforth sell and buy true goods and lawful measures as gallons, pottles, quarts, and half pints under the pain of imprisonment, and there to remain till they have made fine at the will of the said officers.

Also if any brewer or beer-brewer be found faulty in any of the premises after that they have been in times amerced, then the said brewer shall be committed to prison, there to remain till he have fined at the pleasure of the officers of the university.

Also that every tippler and gannaker that selleth ale in this fair that ye have the measure well and lawfully sealed and assized according to the standard of the university, and that every gannaker and beer-brewer that hath beer to sell have a sign at the booth whereby they may the better be known under the peril of imprisonment.

Also that any vintner that hath wine to sell in this fair as white wine, red wine, claret wine, gascon, malmsey, or any other wine, that they sell no dearer than they do in London except an halfpenny in a gallon toward the carriage, and that every vintner have their pots and their measures sized & ensealed after the standard of the university under tbe pain of forfeiture & their bodies to prison.

Also that all persons that bringeth ling-fish, stockfish or any other salt-fish to sell in this fair or within the precincts of the same that they sell no rot fish, no brynt fish, no resty fish, but good lawful and wholesome for man's body under the pain of forfeiture of their fish and their bodies to prison.

Also that all manner of persons which hath salmon, herring or eels to sell in this fair that the vessels called butts, barrels, half barrels, and firkins, they sell none of them afore they be seen and searched and that the butt hold and contain eighty-three gallons, well and truly packed upon pain for every butt, barrel, half barrel so lacking their said measure six shillings and eight pence And that the great salmon be well and truly packed by itself without any meddling of any grills or broken bellied salmon with the same & that all small fish called grills be packed by them self only without any meddling upon pain of forfeiture and lofting of six shillings and eight pence for every butt, barrel and half barrel so found faulty contrary to the statute of the parliament in the which statute these points and other more be more plainly expressed.

Also that any pikemonger that bringeth fresh fish to sell in the fair, as pike, tench, roach, perch, eel or any other fresh fish that the fish be quick and liveish and of size and bigness according to the statute thereof made under the pain of forfeiture and their bodies to prison.

Also that every butcher that bringeth flesh to sell in this fair that he bringeth no rotten flesh, no murrain, no sussners, but lawful and wholesome for man's body and that every butcher bringeth the hide and the tallow of all such flesh as he shall kill to sell in this fair And that every butcher bringeth with him the liver and the lounds Of all such beasts under the pain of forfeiture.

Also that every baker that baketh horsebread to sell, that he selleth three loaves for a penny after good and lawful size and after such size as shall be given them, by the university, and that it be made of good peas & beans & other lawful stuff, upon the pain aforesaid.

Also that all brown bakers, as well as innkeepers as other, observe and keep such size of horsebread as shall be given them by the said officers, under the pains and punishments as of other bakers is rehearsed.

Also that all persons that selleth by measure as by ell or by yard woollen cloth or linen cloth, silk, worsteads sized and ensealed that they have their ells and their yards sized and ensealed after the standard of the university under the pain of forfeiture and their bodies to prison.

Also that all persons that selleth by measure as by bushel, half bushel, peck or half peck as coal, salt, mustard seed or any other thing that their bushels, half bushels and pecks be sized and sealed after the standard of the university under the pain of imprisonment and more punishment as the offence shall require.

Also that all persons that selleth by weight have good and lawful weights sized and ensealed and to agree with the standard weights of the university under the pain of imprisonment and for their fine as it shall please the officers of the university.

Also that no man shall regrate none of the foresaid things as ling fish, salt fish, stock fish, herring, salmon, pike, tench, wax, flax, osmund, rosin, yarn, pitch, tar, cloth, nor none other thing of grocery ware or any other merchandise in this fair under the gain of forfeiture and their bodies to prison & to make fine as it shall please the officers of the university. And he regrateth that buyeth any of the said things afore rehearsed or any other manner of merchandise of any man in this fair and selleth again the same thing in the said fair enhancing the price of the said thing more that it was before.

Also if there be any person that will sue by personal action either for debt, victuals, injury and trespass or think themselves wronged in any of the premises or otherwise, let him come and complain to my Lord Chancellor's Commissary and other officers of the university which shall hold and keep courts daily and hourly in this fair during the same to the intent that he shall be heard with lawful favour, right and conscience and after the liberties of the same.

Also that every butcher that bringeth flesh to sell in this market that they bring no rotten flesh &c, ut supra.

Also that every butcher that bringeth to sell in this market that they sell none of the tallow of all such beasts as they shall bring to sell in this market, but to such Rasment and tallow-candellers as are dwellers within the said university and precincts of the same, & they to make the said tallow in good and lawful candle so that the said university and town of Cambridge be nowise disappointed but the better served and that they sell not a pound of candle above a penny, and that the said butcher sell not a stone of tallow above eight pence.

Also that every innkeeper that keepeth inn that he have his bottles of hay well and lawfully made and sized and that every bottle weigh seven pound & that they sell not less than three horse loaves good and lawful for a penny under the pain of punishment after the discretion of the officers of the university.

Also that every carrier that bringeth wood to sell in this market that they bring good wood, and if it be faggot let the faggot thereof be well filled and sized & that every faggot be full seven foot long and every faggot to have two bounds & thirty-one faggots in a load well filled after the said length under the pain of forfeiture.

Also that every collier that bringeth charcoal to sell that every sack called a quarter sack holds eight bushels, saving that they be allowed for the culm and breaking by the way after the discretion of the officers of the university under pain of forfeiture.

Also that every person that bringeth grain to sell in the market that they open not afore ten of the clock nor to stand after one of the clock under the pain of forfeiture.


A Tudor set of measures

There was an exhibition at the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge (UK) in honour of Cambridge's City Charter in 1201. This included a splendid painting, illustrated with men in academic gowns, with information about weights and measures. It was dated 1590 (which is a little odd, since Elizabeth was queen at the time, and it refers to 'the King'). Some of it was in Latin. Here is the English part. I've typed this in capitals and Roman numerals because that was how the original was written. The spelling is original as well!

THE CHARGE OF THE CLERKE OF THE MARKET
THE COURT FOR ALL MENS WEIGHT, MEASURE AND INTELLERS AND CRAFTSMEN

III BARLY CORNES MAKE A INCH
XII INCHES MAKE A FOOT
I FOOT AND A HALF IS A CUBIT
II CUBITS ARE A STEP
II STEPS AND A HALF ARE A PACE
II PACES AND III FOOT ARE A ROD
XL RODS ARE A FURLONG
VIII FURLONGS ARE A MILE
III BARLY CORNES MAKE A INCH
XII INCHES MAKE A FOOT
III FEET MAKE A YARD
XVI FEET AND A HALF MAKE A ROD
IV RODS IN BREADTH )
XL RODS IN LENGTH   )
MAKE AN ACRE
XXXII GRAINES TAKEN OUT OF THE MIDEST OF THE WEATE EARE,
MAKEST A PENNE, CALLED A STERLINGE.

THE KING OUR SOVEREIGN LORD BY ASSENT OF THE LORDES SPIRITVAL AND TEMPORALL AND THE COMMONS IN THIS PRESENT PARLIAMENT ASSEMBLED, AND BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE SAME ORDAINED, ESTABLISHED , AND ENACTED THAT THE MEASURE OF THE BUSHEL CONTAIN VIII GALLON OF WHEATE AND EVERY GALLON CONTAIN VIII L OF WHEATE OF TROY WEIGHT, EVERY POUND CONTAIN XII OUNCES OF TROY WEIGHT AND EVERY OUNCE CONTAIN XX STERLINGS, AND EVERY STERLING BE THE WEIGHT OF XXX11 CORNES OF WHEAT THAT GREW IN THE MIDST OF THE EARE OF THE WHEATE.
IT IS ORDAINED AND ESTABLISHED THAT NO MAN SHALL BRING INTO THE REALM OF ENGLANDE OF WHAT CONTRY SOEVER, NOR MAKE WITHIN THE SAYD REALM A TUN OF WINE, EXCEPT IT CONTAIN OF ENGLISH MEASURE CCLII GALLONES, THE PIPE CXXVI GALLONES, THE TERTIAN     GALLONES, THE HOGSHEAD LXIII GALLONS, THE BARRELL OF THE HEARINGS AND ELES XXX GALLONS FULLY PAVRED, AND THE BUTT OF SALMON LXXXIV GALLONS.

ANNO R HEN VI II CA 11

HEREIN WITHIN THIS REALME AT THIS DAY TWO KINDS OF WHIGHTS, THE ON CALLED TROY BY WHICH IS WEIGHED GOLD SILVER AND BRASS. THE OTHER CALLED AVERDUPOISE WHEREBY ALL OTHER THINGS BE WEIGHED. THERE IS USED ALLSO TWO KINDS OF MEASURE, THE ONE FOR ALE AND BEERE, THE OTHER FOR WINE, OYLE AND HONY.

There are several points of interest:

I suspect that all this might have led to some arguments!

A correspondent has told me:

Elizabeth 1 ordered a brass yard to be made in 1601 in accordance with a standard measure and copies were distributed to 58 market towns around the kingdom. This yardstick was later measured in 1797 using more scientific methods and found to be 36.015 in. These were the standards as decreed by Elizabeth in 1601 and came into widespread use at that time.

4 grains of barley1 finger (thumb width or one inch)
4 fingers1 hand
4 hands1 foot
3 feet1 yard
1760 yards1 mile

The odd thing about this is that there are 4 hands to a foot, and therefore 16 inches to a foot, which seems weird. Also, there are 4 grains of barley to the inch instead of 3 (as in the above example). However, elsewhere it's said that Edward II decreed that an inch was 3 barleycorns laid end to end. Perhaps these 4 barleycorns were side by side to make an inch. If anyone can give me some more information about Tudor measures, I would be grateful.


A table of tolls

This notice is on the side of a toll cottage. Toll cottages were provided on turnpike roads in the 18th and 19th centuries for the collection of tolls from passing traffic. The money was used to repair and maintain the road. This cottage was originally from Beeding, built on a new road established in 1807. It has been moved to the Weald & Downland Open Air Museum - a great museum, thoroughly recommended, especially in good weather.

Near the end, it says "3,G,4,C,126." This refers to the Act authorising the tols. It means The third year of George IV, chapter 126. This would be 1822, so the notice must be more recent than this.

There are various references to pre-decimal currency, and some lengths, as wheel sizes, and how far a dog is allowed to pull a barrow before it must pay toll!

A table of tolls


Trafalgar Square standard measures

If you look on the north wall of Trafalgar Square, in London (UK), you will see, set into the wall, the "Imperial Standards of Length, placed on this site by the Standards Department of the Board of Trade MDCCCLXXVI - Standards of Length at 62 degrees F". The date is 1876. Shown are one foot, two foot and a yard. The inch is marked as well. Along the bottom of the wall is marked a standard chain (66 feet).
Imperial Standards


Page from 1897 Marlborough Gazateer

The tables on the right are fairly conventional, but the units for the different commodities on the left are fascinating! Load, butt, last, drum, seam, truss, dicker, fother, tierce, hundred, as well as the usual suspects. Apparently, you need to watch out in London, as a stone of meat only weighs 8 pounds, although a country stone of meat weighs the more conventional 14 pounds. Never trust those Londoners!

1897 Marlborough gazateer


Customary Measures

This comes from an old reference book, 'Modern Practical Building, Volume IV' by Harry Newbold, from Caxton Publishing, London, first published in March 1934, this text was the 3rd edition December 1950.

1 bag or sack of plaster (London measure) - 14 pounds or 1 bushel
1 bag or sack of Portland cement - 200 pounds, 2 centals, or 2 bushels
1 bag or sack of lime - 186 pounds or 3 bushels
1 bundle of laths - Approx. 125 laths
500 bricks - 1 load of bricks
1 load of earth or ballast - 1 cubic yard
1 load of lime - 32 bushels
1 pig of ballast - 56 pounds
1 scam of glass - 120 pounds
1 faggot or fodder of lead (London) - 2184 pounds
1 faggot or fodder of steel - 120 pounds

Here are some more commodity units: pig and scam! On the volume page, there are different definitions of a sack or bag, and a load, without specifying the material. I have also had an email about a lime works in Derbyshire in 1794. This produced 114,138 loads of lime, or 5706 score and 18 loads. This means that there are 20 loads to a score. Also apparently there are 8 bushels to a load - yet another value for a 'load'! I would be interested if anyone has any knowledge about these units.


American measuring cups

A correspondent describes an old measuring cup, "The Silver Measuring Glass" manufactured in Brooklyn (NY). It is perhaps a little weird to describe it as a document, but it does give more than just the units of measure. Unfortunately, no-one seems to know how old this cup is. Marked on the cup, at the following equivalent levels are:

4oz ("liquid weight") = 1 "T" Cup
= 2oz (dry weight, i.e. "sifted flour")
= 1 CILL (which may be 'gill' mispelled? See below)
2 "T" Cups = 1 Coffee Cup
= 8oz
= 1/2 pint (2 Cills)
= 1/4 lb (dry weight).

Written on the side are also helpful equivalents:

1 POUND BUTTER MAKES 1 PINT
10 EGGS MAKE 1 PINT
1 POUND SUGAR MAKES 1 PINT
COOL MILK CONTAINS 10% CREAM

This is an interesting collection of units. I wonder if the "T" cup is a teacup? Perhaps we are close enough to the Boston Tea Party to object to mentioning tea! But the equivalence between liquid and dry volume is bizarre. Usually there are two types of ounces, a unit of weight (called ounce or oz.) and a unit of volume (fluid ounce or fl. oz.). This seems to say that an ounce is 2 fluid ounces. Since it also claims a pint is a pound, it is implying that dry measures are twice liquid ones. Since dry measures are now 83% of liquid ones, either measures have changed rapidly in the States, or this measuring cup is distinctly unreliable. If measures have changed, then perhaps Americans should be careful of old recipes! The weight/volume equivalence is interesting. Does it describe a time when recipes went over to volume measurement rather than weight? British cooking books often have an imperial/metric conversion table, and our measuring jugs and scales also have both. This is because we are in the process of converting from Imperial to Metric. 10 eggs to a pint sounds rather a lot. British recipes assume a standard egg to be 2 ounces weight, which is 8 to a pound, or American pint (approximately). I don't think you'd get milk with 10% cream nowadays!

Another correspondent has the same cup. He says "You have to turn it upside down and look very carefully but indeed gill is not misspelled 'cill.' There are minute corners on the capital 'G'. In reference to a 't' cup being 4 ounces, it is known in antique cookbook circles that a modern teacup is not the same measure, the change happening sometime around 1900."

Another correspondent's measuring pitcher:

It is glass.  It has a handle for pouring and the spout is rounded.
On the side written from the bottom to the top dividing the measurements into 4 sections--it says:
1 POUND SUGAR MAKES 1 PINT
1 POUND BUTTER MAKES 1 PINT
GOOD MILK CONTAINS 10% CREAM
On the top of one section it says 1 QUART EVEN FULL. Underneath it and up the side there are 5 lines shown
1 GILL
1/2 PINT
3 GILLS
ONE PINT
On the other side it says at the top it says LIQUID WEIGHTS  (the lines do not correspond with any of the lines on the liquid side).
4 OZ
8 OZ
12 OZ
1 POUND
20 OZ
24 OZ
On the other side at the top it says 8 "T" CUPS OR 4 COFFEE CUPS EVEN FULL. Underneath it and up the side it measures
1 T CUP
2 "T" CUPS or 1 COFFEE CUP
3 "T" CUPS
4 "T" CUPS OR 2 COFFEE CUPS
5 "T" CUPS
On the other side at the top it says POUND FLOUR SIFTED EVEN FULL. Underneath it and up the side it measures
2 OZ
1/4 POUND
6 OZ
1/2 POUND
10 OZ

measuring pitcher

Note the "T" cup again, and the insistance that a pint is a pound (no, it isn't!) Here it's good milk which contains 10% cream rather than cool milk. Anyone who has a measuring jug like this, and knows how old it is or anything about it, let me know, and I'll pass the information on.


"Multum in Parvo" Table Book

This magnificent book of tables was sent to me by Tony Cormack who said "It was one of the text books all new boys received when I went to school in 1951 (along with Kennedy's Latin Primer and Carter's History in 4 volumes). It measures 5" x 3.5" and has 48 pages of tables etc. It is as much a comment on its time as a source of obscure tables."

It is interesting trying to work out how old it is. The list of planets does not mention Pluto, which was discovered in 1930 (and has recently been down-graded to a dwarf planet). It talks about sovereigns, which disappeared when Britain came off the Gold Standard in 1931. In the index, the currency conversation is called "Foreign Monies and their value (1884)" but the page says "Owing to the present international situation these values are not being published". One wonders what the "present international situation" was, coming off the Gold Standard, inflation in Germany, the Second World War. The latest date mentioned is 1952 on the last page - Sovereigns of England (this page is poorer quality than the rest as it is printed on a blue background).

The book is below, scanned in as pictures rather than text, but I have reproduced the index with links, so you can get to the right page quickly.

Part I
Addition Tablespage 7
Aliquot Partspage 22 - page 23
Arithmetic (Defined)page 3
Arithmetic (signs used in)page 3 - page 4
Avoirdupois Weightpage 19
Bronze Tablepage 12
Division Tablepage 9 - page 10
Farthing Tablepage 12
Gold Tablepage 12
Long Measurepage 19
Money Tablepage 11
Measure of Capacitypage 21
Multiplication Tablespage 8 - page 9
New Form of Multiplication
(Pence & Shillings Tables combined)
page 15 - page 18
Numeration Tablepage 6
Pence Tablepage 13 - page 14
Roman Numberspage 5
Silver Tablepage 12
Shillings Tablepage 14 - page 15
Square Measurepage 20
Square Roots & Numberspage 20
Subtraction Tablespage 8
Time Measurepage 21
Part II
Abbreviationspage 45 - page 47
Ale & Beer Measurepage 26
Apothecaries Weightpage 24
Astronomical Motionpage 29
Books (sizes of)page 29
Circular Motionpage 27
Cloth Measurepage 28
Commercial Termspage 40 - page 42
Cubic Measurespage 28
Cube Roots & Numberspage 28
Dry Measurepage 27
Foreign Monies and their value (1884)page 36 - page 37
French Wts. & Measurespage 33 - page 34
French Names of Months and Dayspage 35
Generalpage 39 - page 40
Hay & Straw Weightpage 25
Jewish Daypage 35
Jewish Yearpage 35
Land Measurepage 29
Lengths of Degrees of Latitude
on different parallels
page 32
Liquid Measure (Mis.)page 26
Mental Arithmeticpage 42 - page 44
Miscellaniespage 37 - page 39
Motion of the Earthpage 29
Nautical Measurepage 32
Paper (Sizes of Brown)page 31
Paper (sizes of)page 32
Paper (Drawing) sizes ofpage 32
Points of the Compasspage 48
Quarters of the Yearpage 30
Roman Name of Months and Dayspage 35
Scripture Wts, Measurespage 34
Signs of the Zodiacpage 30
Solar Systempage 30 - page 31
Sovereigns of Englandpage 49
The Watchespage 35
Troy Weightpage 24
Wine & Spirit Measurepage 25
Wool Weightpage 24


Exercise book from Beamish Museum

This is the back of a replica exercise book bought at Beamish, the North of England Open Air Museum, "where the past comes to life". It is obviously modern, bur presumably a reprint of an old exercise book. Unfortunately it doesn't say how old the original is. This is very like the exercise books of my childhood, except it was always "rod, pole or perch". Beamish is a wonderful museum - go and see it if you can!

Exercise book




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