Walks index

Churches in Cambridge


This is not an exhaustive list of all the churches in Cambridge. Also, I have not included the college chapels. Some of these churches are elsewhere on this website as well. I give a link to the churches' listing information, which gives details of dates, etc. Dating churches is hard since the old ones have been restored, often more than once. Some churches are listed A, B or C rather than I, II* or II. They are equivalent grades.

This is not a walk. The churches on this page. are arranged in rough chronological order. You could start at Little St Marys and walk north ending at St Peters, making a brief forray to see St Benets, and that would cover most of the city centre churches. Otherwise, visit these buildings when you are close to them or go to see any that interest you. There is a scale at the bottom of the map. A kilometre is just over half a mile. Things worth looking at are marked in red. Click on them, or on the links, for descriptions and pictures.

These churches are mostly Church of England, and mostly in the Diocese of Ely.

Click here for a website covering nearly all of the Cambridge churches, as well as others in Cambridegshire, with quite a bit of information.

ChurchEarliest DateConnection with university
St Benet11CChapel of Corpus Christi until Tudor times
Church of the Holy Sepulchre (Round Church)12C
St Peter12C
St Edward, King and Martyrearly 13CNorth chapel originally used by Trinity Hall and South chapel by Clare Hall
St Andrews the Lessearly 13C
St Clement13C - 14C
Little St Mary14CChapel of Peterhouse until 1632
St Andrews, Chesterton14C
St Michael or Michaelhouse14CSouth aisle first used as chapel by Michaelhouse and north aisle by Gonville Hall
St Botolph14C - 15CQueens' College have been patron since the 15th Century
Holy TrinityEarly 14C
Great St Mary15CUniversity church
Great St Andrew19C (18C monuments)
All Saints1864
St Matthew1866
St Giles1875
Our Lady and English Martyrs (Roman Catholic Church)1887
Unitarian Church1927
St Edward, King and Martyr St Benet All Saints, Jesus Lane St Andrews, Chesterton St Andrews the Less St Botolph Great St Mary St Matthew St Michael or Michaelhouse St Peter Roman Catholic church Church of the Holy Sepulchre (Round Church) Great St Andrew Holy Trinity St Clement St Giles Little St Mary Unitarian

Map of churches in Cambridge

Click on the photos for a bigger version.

St Benets

St Benets church is on Benet Street. The church is listed Grade I. St Benets is the oldest building in Cambridge and the oldest church in Cambridgeshire. The tower is Saxon, built around 1033. The church is usually open. It is still a parish church. Click here for more, on this website. Click here for the church website.

St Benet

Round Church

Church of the Holy Sepulchre or the Round Church

The Church of the Holy Sepulchre is usually known as the Round Church. It was built around 1130 and is listed Grade I. The original congregation of the Round Church found the building too small, and now use Great St Andrews.This church is usually open, but you may have to pay. Click here for more on the Round Church in this website. Click here for the church website, including the history.

St Peter

St Peter is on Castle Street, to the north of Cambridge. It is listed Grade II*. It dates back to Norman times, but has been largely rebuilt using original material. Click here for more on St Peter's Church in this website.

St Peter

St Peter's font

12th century font with mermen

St Edward, King and Martyr

St Edward's church backs onto Peas Hill. Its entrance is in St Edwards Passage. It is listed Grade II*. Despite the rather startling brick parapet on top of the tower, it dates back to the early 13th century. The church is usually open. Inside, there is Latimer's pulpit. The pulpit dates from around 1510 and has linenfold woodwork. It is said that Thomas Cranmer preached here regularly from this pulpit. Hugh Latimer and Thomas Cramner were notable figures in the English Reformation, and were both burnt at the stake at Oxford under Queen Mary. There is a plaque in Kings Parade marking the sire of the White Horse, where Cambridge scholars debated the works on Martin Luther in the early sixteenth century. This church is often open. Click here for St Edward's church website.

St Edward, King and Martyr

Latimer's pulpit in St Edwards church

Latimer's pulpit


St Andrew the Less

This church used to be known as St Andrew the Less, but is now called Abbey church. It is on Newmarket Road (listed Grade II). It is early 13th century, built by Barnwell Priory. The church was restored in the 19th century. The parish of St Andrews the Less has been taken over by Christchurch close by, and this church is used by a Polish congregation. It is kept locked. Click here for the other buildings of Barnwell Priory, and click here for more information on Barnwell Abbey.

Abbey church Abbey church

St Clement

St Clement is on Bridge Street and is listed Grade B. It was built in the second half of the C13 but restored several times since. It is a parish church, but does not seem to have a website.It is under the episcopal supervision of the Bishop of Richborough, rather than the Bishop of Ely.

St Clement

Little St Mary

Little St Mary

Little St Mary is in Trumpington Street and is listed Grade B. There is a Great St Mary in Cambridge as well, see below. This church was mostly built between 1340 and 1352. It is a parish church. Its churchyard is maintained as a wild garden. Click here for the church's website.


St Andrew, Chesterton

This St Andrew's church is in Church Street, Chesterton (listed Grade I). The original church was 13th century, but the present church is principally 14th and 15th century, with 19th century alterations. Click here for more on the church in this website. Click here for the church website.

St Andrew's Church, Chesterton

St Michael or Michaelhouse

St Michael or Michaelhouse

St Michael's church (listed Grade I) is on Trinity Street. It was built around 1327 partly as a chapel for Michaelhouse, an early college which later became part of Trinity College. There is a cafe called Michaelhouse, which runs various events and exhibitions. Click here for the history of the church, and here for the church website.


St Botolph

St Botolph's church (listed Grade I) is on Trumpington Street. The Church is dedicated to St Botolph, a seventh century abbot in East Anglia, who is the patron saint of travellers. The church was by the south gate of medieval Cambridge, through which travellers from London entered the town. The church was built in 1350, but there were Norman and Saxon churches on the site before. The tower, which is crowned with carved symbols of the four Evangelists, was added in the 15th century. Click here for the history of the church, and here for the church website.

St Botolph

St Botolph

The font and cover date from 1637


Holy Trinity

Holy Trinity church (listed Grade B) is on Market Street. The oldest part of the church seems to be 14th century (from the listing description) but there were additions in the 15C and 16C, and, of course, 19C. Click here for the church website.

Holy Trinity

Holy Trinity


Great St Mary

Great St Mary's church (listed Grade I) near Kings College Chapel, backing onto the Market place. It is called Great St Mary to distinguish it from Little St Mary on Trumpington Street. It is a late 15th century church with the remains of a 14th century chancel. It is the university church, and is considered to be the centre of Cambridge. At the bottom of the tower is a plaque about milestones, and outside there are some fun modern 3D maps. There is a peal of 12 bells, and the church clock strikes the 'Cambridge Quarters', which were copied for the 'Westminister chimes' of Big Ben. You can climb the tower, which gives you a good view of Cambridge, including a startling view of Kings College Chapel. Click here for the church website.

Great St Mary

Great St Mary

Clock on Great St Mary's tower

All Saints

All Saints church (listed Grade B) is in Jesus Lane. Its spire can be seen from Christs Pieces. It was built in 1864. The church is no longer a parish church, but is been under the care of the Churches Conservation Trust. Sometimes exhibitions are held in it, and it often seems to be open. Some of the painted wall and ceiling decorations are by the company of William Morris. Click here for more on the church in this website.

All Saints, Jesus Lane All Saints, Jesus Lane


Great St Andrew

Great St Andrews church is near the Lion Yard and backs on At Andrews Street. It is listed Grade II. It was rebuilt in 1843. There are several 18th century monuments inside the church, including one in memory of Captain Cook. It is a parish church, as the congregation at the Round Church needed more room, so they moved here, and call themselves the Round Church at St Andrews. Click here for the church website.

Great St Andrew

St Matthew

St Matthew's church (listed Grade II) is in the east of Cambridge, in St Matthews Street. It was built in 1866 by R.R. Rowe. It has a Greek cross plan with an central octagon and 4 radiating arms. The preaching house interior was a reaction to Oxford Movement, with a wide central space with lantern. Click here for the church website.

St Matthew

St Giles

St Giles's church (listed Grade II*) is in the north of Cambridge, on Castle Street. It was built in 1875, but it incoporated two arches from the previous church (see below). Click here for the church website.

St Giles St Giles arch St Giles arch


Our Lady and the English Martyrs (Roman Catholic church)

The Roman Catholic Church (listed Grade II*) is at the junction of Hills Road and Lensfield Road, a notable road junction. It was built 1887-1890. The church's spire can be seen along Hills Road and Regent Street, as well as East Road and further. Click here for more on the church, including its history.

Roman Catholic Church

Unitarian Church

Unitarian church

This Unitarian church is in Emmanuel Road. It was built in 1927. Click here for more on the church, including a little on its history.


Finally, I have tried to verify the dates and facts above as much as I could, but I may have made mistakes. If you spot any or want to correct me, please email jo.edkins.walks@gwydir.demon.co.uk